Eric Myers Jazz

work in progress

 

contributions

Jazz writers are invited to contribute to this section of the website. All interested in contributing are welcome to contact the editor by filling out the form in the CONTACT tab. Photographs are welcome and should be attached. Readers can click on the INDEX button for a list of articles in this folder.

 
Allen Ginsberg & Jack Kerouac

Allen Ginsberg & Jack Kerouac

JACK KEROUAC AND THE INFLUENCE OF BEBOP

 by David Kastin

Excerpt from the book Nica’s Dream: The Life and Legend of the Jazz Baroness

New York, 2011

Like many members of his generation, Jack Kerouac had been enthralled by the dynamic rhythms of the swing era big bands he listened to on the radio as a teenager. Of course, what he heard was the result of the same racial segregation that was imposed on most areas of American life. The national radio networks, as well as most of the independent local stations, were vigilant in protecting the homes of the dominant culture against the intrusion of any and all soundwaves of African American origin. That left a lineup of all-white big bands, ranging from "sweet" orchestras playing lush arrangements of popular songs to "hot" bands who provided a propulsive soundtrack for even the most fervent jitterbugs…

Sarah Vaughan

Sarah Vaughan

AN EXCHANGE I HAD WITH SARAH VAUGHAN

by Wynton Marsalis

October 20, 2017

It was in Symphony Hall, one of the most fantastic and beautiful places to play in the world. Secondly, it was with the Boston Pops and their tradition was known and respected across the country. Thirdly, John Williams was conducting and every trumpet player in the world loved him for writing Star Wars, and finally, I was playing with the Divine One, Miss Sarah Vaughan known to be hard on the unprepared…

Thelonious Monk

Thelonious Monk

THELONIOUS MONK AND THE FIVE SPOT

by David Kastin

Excerpts from the book Nica’s Dream: The Life and Legend of the Jazz Baroness

New York, 2011

Fireworks lit up the sky the night Thelonious Monk made his return to the Big Apple jazz scene. OK, so it just happened to be the Fourth of July, 1957, and along the Bowery, the only bright spot in the murky thoroughfare was the dim glow from the window of the Five Spot Café. Though the historic significance of Monk's opening night may have escaped the notice of most New Yorkers, for a small circle of intimates, including Nellie, Nica, David Amram, and Harry Colomby, it was a profoundly moving moment…